GIS day

   University of Idaho Library
   November 20, 2013
   9:00a–5:00p

Join the one-day global celebration!
We'll have posters, presentations, refreshments, demos, and giveaways!

GIS/CI Day provides an international forum for users of geographic information systems (GIS) and cyberinfrastructure (CI) technology to demonstrate real-world applications that are making a difference in our society.

The UI Library is hosting a GIS/CI Day event that will include presentations that span a variety of GIS/CI-related topics and posters that will be displayed about GIS/CI-related projects. This event will take place on the 1st floor of the library.

Contact Bruce Godfrey (bgodfrey@uidaho.edu, ph. 208-292-1407) for more information.

Learn more about GIS Day at http://www.gisday.com.

Agenda:

PRESENTATIONS   DEMONSTRATIONS
Time Title/Presenter Description  
9:00 AM Fast and Furious: Science Research Enabled by Campus Network Infrastructure Improvements
Luke Sheneman, IT Architect and Administrator / CI Research Coordinator, Northwest Knowledge Network
The U of I was recently awarded nearly $500K by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to upgrade the campus network backbone and Internet connection, significantly increasing our ability to move data both on campus and to/from the outside world. This award benefits all users of the campus network, but it is a transformational improvement for researchers who need to access, move, and analyze growing scientific data sets. The ten-fold improvement in network throughput will explicitly benefit scientific computing groups on the UI campus - namely the Institute for Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Studies (IBEST) and the Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN). Among other things, this award will establish a true "Science DMZ" at U of I which will provide dedicated, high-speed networks connecting scientific data repositories at the U of I and Idaho National Laboratory. This presentation will focus on the NSF award, how it will affect the U of I campus, and how it will benefit and enable data management and data-intensive science at the U of I.

Geospatial

software

demonstrations

(throughout the day)

9:30 AM Data Visualization Using the IQ Station
Ben Bright, US Forest Service
This presentation will explain what the IQ (Inexpensive Immersive Interactive Interface) Station located on the 4th floor of the UI library is and what kind of data can be shown on it. How the IQ station can be used to visualize LiDAR data will be detailed.

There will be an IQ Station open house from 10:00 a.m. to noon in room 414 of the library.
10:00 AM The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) and What You Can Do To Help Build the Academic Research Cloud
Greg Gollberg, Operations Manager, Northwest Knowledge Network
Stay ahead of the publishing curve in research. The why's and how's of publishing your data fast.

 

IQ Station
demonstrations
10:00 AM — Noon
(Library room 414)

 

 

 

 

 

 

IQ Station
demonstrations
10:00 AM — Noon
(Library room 414)

10:30 AM * * * BREAK * * *
11:00 AM The Online Data Observatory: Scientific Big Data and the Northwest Knowledge Network
Luke Sheneman, IT Architect and Administrator / CI Research Coordinator, Northwest Knowledge Network
The term "Big Data" is used to describe the art and science of performing fast, scalable analytics on structured and unstructured data in order to derive knowledge. The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) is an initiative sponsored by the University of Idaho Office of Research and Economic Development (ORED) to create a regional research data repository using a distributed storage architecture with nodes located across Idaho at the University of Idaho and Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This presentation will focus on the state of Scientific Big Data and present examples of how this paradigm could impact how we do science, it will introduce NKN and describe how we implement some Big Data techniques now, and it will outline our vision and path forward for exploiting Scientific Big Data.
11:30 AM Got Data, Now What: An IGS Online Map Application
Loudon Stanford, Manager Digital Geologic Mapping, IGS
The Idaho Geological Survey has been digitally compiling geologic map data for nearly 25 years. New field techniques and tools as well as better data capture software and schemas have improved our data quality and have increased productivity over that time. Delivering these datasets to technical users and the general public is equally important to our mission. This talk will discuss the recent deployment of a web-based online map application designed to better meet these needs.
12:00 PM GIS Applications in Hazards Research at the University of Idaho
Kevin Henry & Courtney Thompson, Graduate Students, Hazards Research Group, Department of Geography
GIS is an indispensable tool within natural hazards research, used in analysis, visualization, prediction and policy. This presentation will delineate the various research performed within the Hazards Research Group at the University of Idaho in the Department of Geography and the Bio-regional Planning program that utilizes GIS. Topics include vulnerability analyses and hazard exposure modeling, for hazards ranging from physical hazards such as floods, tsunamis and hurricanes, to societal hazards such as food security and public health.

 

 

 

 

Geospatial

software

demonstrations

(throughout the day)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geospatial

software

demonstrations

(throughout the day)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geospatial

software

demonstrations

(throughout the day)

12:30 PM * * * BREAK * * *
1:00 PM GIS Tools to Estimate Bicycle Volumes and Assess Quality of Service for Bicycle Travel
Michael Lowry,
College of Engineering
Assistant Professor
This presentation describes various GIS tools created to estimate bicycle volumes throughout a street network. The primary estimation tool is based on a modified form of centrality—a measure from graph theory used to quantify the relative importance of each link and node in a network. One common formulation of centrality calculates the number of times a link in a network is used along the path of all shortest paths between all nodes. We modify the equation to better represent bicycle travel and call the new metric origin-destination centrality. For our case study, the new metric exhibits high correlation (R2 = 0.73) with observed bicycle counts at intersections. We demonstrate how origin-destination centrality can be used to spatially interpolate field observations. Unlike other bicycle demand estimation methods, this approach requires commonly available data, is easy to use, and produces directional volumes (some methods only estimate non-directional aggregate counts). The new method was programmed as a tool for geographic information systems using modifiable open-source python code. The tool requires (1) a street network, (2) digital elevation map, (3) parcel data, and (4) observed bicycle counts at select locations throughout the study area. The observed counts can be collected through any manner, but the tool was specifically designed for planners and engineers working with count data collected manually in a manner similar to the National Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project.
1:30 PM Data Discovery and Integration: Data Publishing Essentials for UI Researchers and Students
Jeremy Kenyon, Research Librarian, UI Library
Data Steward, USGS Northwest/Southwest Climate Science Centers
How to publish scientific articles are part of every student's education, yet how to publish data is less clear and only occasionally taught. This presentation will cover the essentials of data publication, including how to improve discoverability of your dataset, how to improve its ability to be cited (citability), and what services are available at UI to help you with this process. I will also cover some of the range of options for discovering others' data and how you can integrate your datasets into this growing network.
2:00 PM Using Geospatial Information for Agriculture and Climate Change Analysis: Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA)
Erich Seamon, Environmental Data Manager for REACCH
The Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA) is a U.S. Department of Agriculture – National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded project that brings together researchers from WSU, UI, and OSU to better understand agriculture and climate change in the pacific northwest. This presentation will give an overview of the varied geospatial datasets, analyses, and toolsets being used by REACCH researchers to better understand our pacific northwest region, with a particular emphasis on data management and cyberinfrastructure.
2:30 PM * * * RAFFLE DRAWING AND BREAK * * *
3:00 PM Understanding the Context of a City through the use of Geographic Information Systems
Jeff Stiltz, Graduate Student, Landscape Architecture & GIS Certificate Program
Using GIS to model Kevin Lynch's five elements of a city to recognize opportunities in city planning. The method was applied to Moscow, Idaho and focused on techniques for universal application for initial planning.
3:30 PM Why Generate Metadata & How to Create Metadata for Your Research Community
Linda Tedrow, NSF EPSCoR, College of Natural Resources
This presentation will cover what metadata is, why we need to make it, why we archive data and a worksheet and online tool for generating metadata and storing data.
4:00 PM The Photo-Mosaic Assistant: Incorporating Historic Aerial Imagery into Modern Research Projects
Edward Flathers, Graduate Student, Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
One challenge that researchers face as data organization and analysis shift into the digital realm is the incorporation of "dirty" data from analog back-catalogs into modern GIS projects. The Photo-Mosaic Assistant (PMA) is a collection of tools designed to assist in the organization of historic aerial photo collections and the preparation of collections for georegistration or orthorectification and use in modern research applications.
4:30 PM * * * RAFFLE DRAWING AND WRAP UP * * *

Partners:

               

               



 EVENT LOCATION:
 University of Idaho Library, South Rayburn Street, Moscow, ID
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