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3001, Inc. Aerials Express
Boise County Emergency Management Boise National Forest
Bonneville County Bureau of Reclamation, Snake River Area Office
Canyon County Caribou County GIS
Clark County Clearwater County
Coeur d'Alene Tribe Idaho Center for GIS and Mapping
Idaho County Assessors Office Idaho Department of Environmental Quality
Idaho Department of Fish and Game Idaho Department of Lands
Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation Idaho Department of Water Resources
Idaho EPSCoR Office Idaho Geological Survey
Idaho Geospatial Data Clearinghouse Idaho Legislative Services Office
Idaho LiDAR Consortium Idaho State Climate Services
Idaho State University-GIS TReC Idaho Transportation Department
Kootenai County Latah County
National Agricultural Statistics Service Nez Perce County GIS
Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District North Central Idaho Wildfire Restoration Group
Pixxures, Inc. Premier Geospatial, Inc.
SPOT Image Corporation SURDEX Corporation
U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Idaho State Office U.S. Geological Survey
United States General Land Office University of Idaho Building Sustainable Communities Initiative
University of Idaho Department of Civil Engineering University of Idaho Facilities Services
University of Idaho Library USDA-FSA-APFO Aerial Photography Field Office


Records from Idaho Department of Environmental Quality:

Page 1 2  [Records 1 through 20 of 27]
2008 Final Integrated Report 305B/303D for Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 2008 305(b) & 303(d) Integrated Report - Water Quality. Every two years, DEQ is required by the federal Clean Water Act to conduct a comprehensive analysis of Idaho's water bodies to determine whether they meet state water quality standards and support beneficial uses or if additional pollution controls are needed. This analysis is summarized in an "Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report" (Integrated Report), which is submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for approval. The report serves as a guide for developing and implementing water quality improvement plans (total maximum daily loads, or TMDLs) to protect water quality and achieve federal and state water quality standards.

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2010 Final Integrated Report 305B for Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Sections 305(b) and 314 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) require states, territories, and authorized tribes to provide biennial reports to EPA on the condition of waters within their boundaries. EPA regulations at 40 CFR 130.7 require states to provide biennial submissions of impaired waters lists. EPA provides guidance on these reports in a way that supports the Agency's strategy for achieving a broad-scale, national inventory of water quality conditions. The guidance is from EPA to states, territories, authorized tribes, and interstate commissions ("jurisdictions") to help states prepare and submit Section 305(b) reports to EPA. Use of the integrated report (IR) format provides jurisdictions a recommended reporting format and suggested content to be used in developing a single document that integrates the reporting requirements of Sections 303(d), 305(b), and 314. This format allows jurisdictions to report on the water quality standards attained for all waters, document the availability of data and information for each segment, identify certain trends in water quality conditions, and set priorities for protecting and restoring the health of the nation's aquatic resources. Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act requires each state to conduct water quality surveys to determine a water body's overall health, including whether or not basic uses are being met. States, tribes, and other jurisdictions define appropriate uses for a waterbody and incorporate these uses into water quality standards that are approved by EPA. Water body uses include aquatic life protection, fish and shellfish production, drinking water supply, swimming, boating, fishing, and agricultural irrigation, among others.

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2014 Final Integrated Report - Idaho DEQ §305B Streams and Lakes
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Sections 305(b) and 314 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) require states, territories, and authorized tribes to provide biennial reports to EPA on the condition of waters within their boundaries. EPA regulations at 40 CFR 130.7 require states to provide biennial submissions of impaired waters lists. EPA provides guidance on these reports in a way that supports the Agency's strategy for achieving a broad-scale, national inventory of water quality conditions. The guidance is from EPA to states, territories, authorized tribes, and interstate commissions ("jurisdictions") to help states prepare and submit Section 305(b) reports to EPA. Use of the integrated report (IR) format provides jurisdictions a recommended reporting format and suggested content to be used in developing a single document that integrates the reporting requirements of Sections 303(d), 305(b), and 314. This format allows jurisdictions to report on the water quality standards attained for all waters, document the availability of data and information for each segment, identify certain trends in water quality conditions, and set priorities for protecting and restoring the health of the nation's aquatic resources. Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act requires each state to conduct water quality surveys to determine a water body's overall health, including whether or not basic uses are being met. States, tribes, and other jurisdictions define appropriate uses for a waterbody and incorporate these uses into water quality standards that are approved by EPA. Water body uses include aquatic life protection, fish and shellfish production, drinking water supply, swimming, boating, fishing, and agricultural irrigation, among others.

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BURP Stream Monitoring Locations (IDEQ)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

In 1993, the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) embarked on a pilot monitoring program, the Beneficial Use Reconnaissance Project (now Beneficial Use Reconnaissance Program [BURP]) aimed at integrating biological monitoring with physical habitat assessment to characterize stream integrity and the quality of Idaho's waters. The program has been implemented statewide since 1994. DEQ's past monitoring and assessment practices and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rapid bioassessment protocols (RBPs) provided the foundation for BURP monitoring protocols. The purpose of BURP is to assist in determining the existing uses and beneficial use support status of Idaho's water bodies. The purposes of an annual BURP work plan are to provide background information about the program and list program objectives for a specific year. A companion to this work plan, the Beneficial Use Reconnaissance Program Field Manual for Wadeable (Small) Streams (Clark, in prep), describes the methods used in BURP.

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EPA 98 303(D) Stream Temperature Additions of Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 303(d) Additions for Temperature and Sediment, added by the EPA for the 1998 Reporting year.

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ID 305(b) 303(d) Mercury Impaired Waterbodies (2008)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 2008 305(b) / 303(d) Mercury Lakes represent water bodies that are impaired and fail to meet water quality standards for mercury. This information is also available in the Idaho 2008 Integrated 305(b) Report submitted to the EPA in accordance with Federal Clean Water Act. Sources of mercury pollution in Idaho include a mixture of in-state and out-of-state human-caused and natural processes such as mining operations, petroleum combustion, coal-powered plants, various manufacturing sources, sewage treatment plants, landfills, and other sources.

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Idaho 2012 305(b) and 303(d) Streams/Lakes Integrated Report (Final)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Sections 305(b) and 314 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) require states, territories, and authorized tribes to provide biennial reports to EPA on the condition of waters within their boundaries. EPA regulations at 40 CFR 130.7 require states to provide biennial submissions of impaired waters lists. EPA provides guidance on these reports in a way that supports the Agency's strategy for achieving a broad-scale, national inventory of water quality conditions. The guidance is from EPA to states, territories, authorized tribes, and interstate commissions ("jurisdictions") to help states prepare and submit Section 305(b) reports to EPA. Use of the integrated report (IR) format provides jurisdictions a recommended reporting format and suggested content to be used in developing a single document that integrates the reporting requirements of Sections 303(d), 305(b), and 314. This format allows jurisdictions to report on the water quality standards attained for all waters, document the availability of data and information for each segment, identify certain trends in water quality conditions, and set priorities for protecting and restoring the health of the nation's aquatic resources. Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act requires each state to conduct water quality surveys to determine a water body's overall health, including whether or not basic uses are being met. States, tribes, and other jurisdictions define appropriate uses for a waterbody and incorporate these uses into water quality standards that are approved by EPA. Water body uses include aquatic life protection, fish and shellfish production, drinking water supply, swimming, boating, fishing, and agricultural irrigation, among others.

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Idaho 305(b) 303(d) Mercury Impaired Waterbodies (2008)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 2008 305(b) / 303(d) Mercury Streams represent water bodies that are impaired and fail to meet water quality standards for mercury. This information is also available in the Idaho 2008 Integrated 305(b) Report submitted to the EPA in accordance with Federal Clean Water Act. Sources of mercury pollution in Idaho include a mixture of in-state and out-of-state human-caused and natural processes such as mining operations, petroleum combustion, coal-powered plants, various manufacturing sources, sewage treatment plants, landfills, and other sources.

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Idaho DEQ 2008 305(b) 303(d) Integrated Report Lakes
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 2008 305(b) & 303(d) Integrated Report - Water Quality. Lakes/Waterbodies This layers contains lakes, reservoirs, and rivers georeferenced as polygons. Every two years, DEQ is required by the federal Clean Water Act to conduct a comprehensive analysis of Idaho's water bodies to determine whether they meet state water quality standards and support beneficial uses or if additional pollution controls are needed. This analysis is summarized in an "Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report" (Integrated Report), which is submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for approval. The report serves as a guide for developing and implementing water quality improvement plans (total maximum daily loads, or TMDLs) to protect water quality and achieve federal and state water quality standards. Many smaller and unassessed lakes were coded with the assessment unit of the waterbody outlet or inlet, thus may contain a support status attribute designated for the stream.

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IDEQ Air Quality Monitoring Locations
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Locations of DEQ Air monitoring locations with Monitoring type and Pollutant. DEQ's monitoring network measures the levels of five of the six ambient air criteria pollutants identified by the federal Clean Air Act. The criteria pollutants are: Particulate matter (PM10 = particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microns in diameter; PM2.5 = particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 microns in diameter) Carbon monoxide Nitrogen dioxide Sulfur dioxide Ozone Lead (Airborne lead is no longer considered a major health threat in most of the U.S. With the phase-out of leaded gasoline and closure of the Bunker Hill Mine, DEQ no longer monitors airborne lead levels.)

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Lakes of Idaho (303(d) Impaired - 1998)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Impaired waterbodies (lakes) 1998 EPA reporting year. With over 92,000 miles of rivers and streams and over 100 lakes and reservoirs, water is one of Idaho's most important resources. Our rivers, lakes, streams, and wetlands not only provide great natural beauty, they supply the water necessary for drinking, recreation, industry, agriculture, and aquatic life. DEQ's Surface Water Program is responsible for assuring Idaho's streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands meet their designated beneficial uses and Idaho water quality standards.

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Lakes of Idaho (305(b) & 303(d) Integrated Report - Water Quality - 2002)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 305(b) Lakes, Lakes Designated with Waterbody IDs, Beneficial Uses. Support status for the 2002 CWA reporting year. Based upon 100k NHD Hydrography.

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Lakes of Idaho (305(b) Beneficial Use)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Idaho 305(b) Lakes, Lakes Designated with Waterbody IDs, Beneficial Uses, 100k NHD Hydrography

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Nitrate Priority Areas (2014)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Pursuant to guidance provided in the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) policy memorandum entitled "Policy for Addressing Degraded Ground Water Quality Areas" dated March 1, 2000, a statewide list of significantly degraded areas with nitrate was developed. In 2002, the DEQ, in cooperation with the Idaho Ground Water Monitoring Technical Committee (GWMTC) published a ranking of 25 Nitrate Priority Areas (NPAs). The NPAs are areas where elevated levels of nitrate have been found in ground water. In 2013-14, incorporating recent monitoring, 34 NPA's were evaluated and prioritized.DEQ, in conjunction with the GWMTC revised the NPAs published in 2008. The revisions utilized data collected since the original NPAs were developed to evaluate ground water quality changes in existing NPAs and to identify new areas with nitrate degraded ground water. In the summer of 2011 the GWMTC began the process of revising the NPAs. The minimum criterion for a Priority 1 NPA is 25% of sampled wells have nitrate levels at or above 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The state and federal drinking water standard, as well as the Idaho Ground Water Quality Standard for nitrate is 10 mg/L. Within a Priority 2 NPA 50% of the sampled wells have nitrate levels at or above 2 mg/L. Almost all developed areas of the state meet this criterion.The NPA Ranking Process (Ranking Process), developed by DEQ, in consultation with the GWMTC, provides the rationale for numerically ranking areas in Idaho with identified ground water degradation from nitrates. The statewide priority list created through this process will be used to prioritize the implementation of protective management strategies or corrective action measures within the NPAs.In the summer of 2011, DEQ began collecting and compiling nitrate results and well location data from the numerous agencies monitoring ground water quality in Idaho. Well location information, sampling date, and nitrate concentration data were received and compiled by DEQ. Spatial information was reconciled and integrated into a Geographic Information System (GIS) coverage.Sources of data included the DEQ public water system database, the Statewide Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network (Statewide Program), numerous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies, DEQ regional and local monitoring projects, regional studies conducted by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA), and dairy sampling by ISDA. Data from 1990 into 2011 were plotted with the corresponding nitrate value. The 2008 NPAs were based on data from 1990 - 2007 and the 2012 NPAs were based on data from 1990-2011. The use of more recent data resulted in a difference of sample numbers between the 2008 and 2012 NPA analysis. For sites with multiple values the most recent value was used. Data from site-specific monitoring projects associated with known point sources of nitrate contamination were not included in the data set. Ground water quality data from about 11,000 wells statewide were compiled and evaluated to develop the 2012 NPAs. The NPAs contain over 4,000 of the 11,000 wells and encompass a combined area of 2,138,930 acres. Approximately 400,000 people are estimated to live within the boundaries of the NPAs.

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Nitrate Priority Areas of Idaho (2002)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

This data set was developed by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to represents the group 1 nitrate priority areas with in the state of Idaho. The data was developed utilizing 1999 and 2000 Public Water System groundwater samples, and the most recent statewide monitoring network, Idaho Department of Agriculture, United State Geological Survey, and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality local and regional monitoring project anylitical data.

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Nitrate Priority Areas of Idaho (2008)
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Pursuant to guidance provided in the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) policy memorandum entitled "Policy for Addressing Degraded Ground Water Quality Areas" dated March 1, 2000, a statewide list of significantly degraded areas with nitrate was developed. In 2002, the DEQ, in cooperation with the Idaho Ground Water Monitoring Technical Committee (GWMTC) published a ranking of 25 Nitrate Priority Areas (NPAs). The NPAs are areas where elevated levels of nitrate have been found in ground water. In 2008, incorporating recent monitoring, 32 NPA's were evaluated and prioritized. DEQ, in conjunction with the GWMTC revised the NPAs published in 2002. The revisions utilized data collected since the original NPAs were developed to evaluate ground water quality changes in existing NPAs and to identify new areas with nitrate degraded ground water. In the summer of 2006 the GWMTC began the process of revising the NPAs. Based on experience gained since 2002, which provided agencies with a better understanding of the resources necessary to address ground water degradation over large areas, it was decided to limit the effort to delineating only Priority I NPAs and not include Priority 2 NPAs. DEQ, in conjunction with the GWMTC revised the NPAs published in 2002. The revisions utilized data collected since the original NPAs were developed to evaluate ground water quality changes in existing NPAs and to identify new areas with nitrate degraded ground water. In the summer of 2006 the GWMTC began the process of revising the NPAs. Based on experience gained since 2002, which provided agencies with a better understanding of the resources necessary to address ground water degradation over large areas, it was decided to limit the effort to delineating only Priority I NPAs and not include Priority 2 NPAs. The minimum criterion for a Priority 1 NPA is 25% of sampled wells have nitrate levels at or above 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The state and federal drinking water standard, as well as the Idaho Ground Water Quality Standard for nitrate is 10 mg/L. Within a Priority 2 NPA 50% of the sampled wells have nitrate levels at or above 2 mg/L. Almost all developed areas of the state meet this criterion.

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Nitrate Priority Wells (2007) Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Well data compiled from various federal and state agencies to be used for updating Nitrate Priority Areas, 2008

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Nonattainment Areas (Air Quality) of Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

Areas within Idaho where air pollution levels persistently exceed the national ambient air quality standards may be designated "nonattainment." EPA considers any geographic area that meets or has pollutant levels below the NAAQS an attainment area. Under ideal circumstances, all of Idaho would be classified as “attainment.” An area with persistent high pollutant levels is designated a nonattainment area. This means that the area has violated federal health-based standards for outdoor air pollution. Each nonattainment area is declared for a specific pollutant. This means that the same area could be “attainment” for one pollutant, but “nonattainment” for a different pollutant. Nonattainment areas for different pollutants may overlap each other or share common boundaries.

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Point Source Emission Facilties (Title V) of Idaho
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 added a Title V to the Act which requires states to administer a comprehensive permit program for the operation of sources emitting air pollutants. These requirements are modeled after similar provisions in the Clean Water Act. Previously, the Clean Air Act contained limited provision for permits, requiring only new or modified major stationary sources to obtain construction permits (under Section 165 of the Act). Sources subject to the permit requirements generally include major sources that emit or have the potential to emit 100 tons per year of any regulated pollutant, plus stationary and area sources that emit or have potential to emit lesser specified amounts of hazardous air pollutants. However, in nonattainment areas, the permit requirements also include sources which emit as little as 50, 25, or 10 tons per year of VOCs, depending on the severity of the region's nonattainment status (serious, severe, or extreme). States were required to develop permit programs and to submit those programs for EPA approval by November 15, 1993. EPA had one year to approve or disapprove a state's submission in whole or in part. After the effective date of a state plan, sources had 12 months to submit an actual permit application. States are to collect annual fees from sources sufficient to cover the "reasonable costs" of administering the permit program, with revenues to be used to support the agency's air pollution control program. The fee must be at least $25 per ton of regulated pollutants (excluding carbon monoxide). Permitting authorities have discretion not to collect fees on emissions in excess of 4,000 tons per year and may collect other fee amounts, if appropriate. The permit states which air pollutants a source is allowed to emit. As a part of the permit process, a source must prepare a compliance plan and certify compliance. The term of permits is limited to no more than 5 years; sources are required to renew permits at that time. State permit authorities must notify contiguous states of permit applications that may affect them; the application and any comments of contiguous states must be forwarded to EPA for review. EPA can veto a permit; however, this authority is essentially limited to major permit changes. EPA review need not include permits which simply codify elements of a state's overall clean air plan, and EPA has discretion to not review permits for small sources. Holding a permit to some extent shields a source from enforcement actions: the Act provides that a source cannot be held in violation if it is complying with explicit requirements addressed in a permit, or if the state finds that certain provisions do not apply to that source.

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Salmonid Spawning
Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

In order for the state of Idaho to utilize temperature criteria to protect various stream uses, such as spawning, the state is required to designate when and where spawning may occur. While Idaho previously has some waters designated for salmonid spawning in its water quality standards, many other waters where salmonids may or do spawn remain undesignated. This data takes the Idaho 305(b) streams and determines which portions of them are possible salmonid spawning areas.

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Page 1 2  [Records 1 through 20 of 27]